npr:

What It’s Like To Drop 150,000 Feet Straight Down

If I say “meet me 28 miles from here,” that doesn’t seem very far, right? You could take a taxi, a bus; if pushed you might even make it on a bike.

But what if the 28 miles is not on a road or a highway, but straight up, 150,000 feet — that’s high. So high, we’re out of the life zone. Up in the silence.

This video, created by NASA and sound designed by the amazing folks at Skywalker Sound, lets you rise those 150,000 feet on a solid rocket booster, and then, after helping the space shuttle shoot into orbit, you (and the booster) tumble straight back to Earth.

Read the rest on Robert Krulwich’s blog.

Easily one of the wildest things I’ve ever seen.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

1,027 notes

jtotheizzoe:

NASA Sees Photosynthesis From Space

Plants are often unable to absorb all the light that hits their leaves and chloroplasts. A small portion is re-emitted as fluorescence, it’s just that we can’t see the faint signal in broad daylight.

But satellites can. NASA shows you what plant fluorescence looks like from orbit. This kind of data is key to understanding the health of global vegetation.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

(Source: typetoy, via whereislittlemaggie)

222 notes

distant-traveller:

Looking down on a shooting star

This astronaut photograph, taken from the International Space Station while over China (approximately 400 kilometers to the northwest of Beijing), provides the unusual perspective of looking down on a meteor as it passes through the atmosphere. The image was taken on August 13, 2011, during the Perseid Meteor Shower that occurs every August.

Image credit: NASA

distant-traveller:

Looking down on a shooting star

This astronaut photograph, taken from the International Space Station while over China (approximately 400 kilometers to the northwest of Beijing), provides the unusual perspective of looking down on a meteor as it passes through the atmosphere. The image was taken on August 13, 2011, during the Perseid Meteor Shower that occurs every August.

Image credit: NASA

(via paradoxicalparadigms)

n-a-s-a:

Orange Sun Scintillating
Image Credit & Copyright: Alan Friedman

n-a-s-a:

Orange Sun Scintillating

Image Credit & Copyright: Alan Friedman

(via oxane)

divineirony:

Curiosity up close.

divineirony:

Curiosity up close.

Watching the live NASA-JPL feed for Mars Science Laboratory/Mars Curiosity

theadventuresofmichaelpawlak:

http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/mars/curiosity_news3.html

So psyched.

9 notes

guardian:

Photograph: NASA
This image shows ocean surface currents around the world during the period from June 2005 to December 2007. See more satellite images of the earth in our gallery.

guardian:

Photograph: NASA

This image shows ocean surface currents around the world during the period from June 2005 to December 2007. See more satellite images of the earth in our gallery.

(Source: , via thejives)

(via crookedindifference)

245 notes